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20121202
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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
cuts and tax increases but spending cuts particularly in defense. they don't want that. >> explain why what they agree on -- namely that the middle class, 98% of all taxpayers, that their taxes will stay the same, they will not go up. if everyone agrees at least on that, the president says, go ahead and pass that. why not just eliminate the 98% who won't have any changes, those making under $250,000? why not allow that to go forward? why are the republicans resisting on that. >> it could wind up there, wolf. but if the republicans lose that, they believe they kind of lose the leverage that they have. if they sort of give on that, then where's their leverage with the white house? so i think that in the end, wolf, if i had to bet -- and i don't like to bet on these things because they always disappoint -- but i would have to say that the one thing they are all likely to do at some point is to make sure the taxes do not go up on the middle class. but in order to do that, republicans want to get some concessions for that. it seems very easy to do that. democrats have done it in the past. a
the future of gay marriage throughout the entire united states. at issue is the federal government defense of marriage act that defines marriage as only the union between a man and woman and california's proposition 8 which banned gay marriage was overturned by an appeals court. cnn's crime and justice correspondent joe johns has been following both cases for us. joe, explain the impact of today's decision. >> well, it is big impact. as you know, this is one of those cases that people talk about over the water cooler. let's start with proposition 8. very simple, wolf, it is the california ballot initiative passed in 2008 by the people of the state of california that established marriage as between a man and a woman. it overturned a court case that said same sex couples have the right to marry. windsor is the other case you were talking about, it is an attack on defense of marriage act which was passed in 1996 by the congress, signed by the president. it's called windsor against the united states. it is about a woman named edith windsor who had a long time relationship with her partner, and
of across the board tax increases for everyone, coupled with cuts in spending like defense, education, health care, and housing assistance. let's go live to our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin with the very latest. jessica? >> reporter: president obama has now personally turned down speaker boehner's opening offer to avert the fiscal cliff. he did it in a tv interview. what does president obama think of speaker boehner's proposal to avert the fiscal cliff? >> unfortunately, the speaker's proposal right now is still out of balance. he talks about $800 billion worth of revenues but says he's going to do that by lowering rates. when you look at the math, it doesn't work. >> reporter: he won't agree to eliminate a tax deduction for contributions to charity. >> every hospital and university and nonfor profit agency across the country would find themselves on the verge of collapse. so that's not a realistic option. >> reporter: but the president didn't say all this to speaker boehner. he said it in an interview on bloomberg tv. the last time the two men spoke was almost a wee
a little over three weeks. those increases coupled with spending cuts in vital programs including defense, health care and housing assistance are being called the fiscal cliff. the only way to i void it is for president obama and congress to make a deal, cutting spending and raising revenue. adding to the sense of urgency. news that 350,000 people simply gave up looking for work in the month of november. and while that drove the unemployment rate down to 7.7%, the fiscal cuts and tax hikes are expected to dramatically slow job creation and increase unemployment possibly plunging the economy back into a recession. let's go to dana joining us from capitol hill. the latest negotiations don't seem to be going anywhere. >> they sure don't. the house speaker ended the week by calling it a wasted week. he only had one phone call with the president of the united states and he said it was just, "more of the same." now counter offer to what the republicans put out during the week which was $800 billion in new tax revenue. so there's certainly a lot of frustration. particularly right now on the side
over the cliff is okay, because liberals say, you know what, we get those defense cuts we wouldn't get otherwise, and they believe the public would not like to see that, and i think at some point, wolf, you have to say, i don't know when it is, but at some point the president and his people as dana bash was just talking about, need to get to the negotiating table. let's be fair to the house speaker. he put a plan on the table that included revenues, substantial revenues, not raising the rates, i mean, that's the big problem. but he did do that -- lots of outside conservative groups are now railing against him. but he did put something on the table that was a serious plan, and the white house is not dealing with him on it, so the president has leverage, but at a certain point they all have to behave like grown-ups. >> newt gingrich knows something about going eyeball to eyeball with a democratic president. that happened in the '90s with billi bill clinton. listen to what he says about the fiscal cliff? >> i think no deal is better than a bad deal. i think going off this cliff is less da
those weapons are actually being loaded into bombs. it's a move the defense secretary leon panetta is reiterating would be a red line for the united states. and it's a moment senator john mccain now claims may be the last warning washington gets. cnn's senior international correspondent arwa damon is inside syria right now where the fighting rages on. >> reporter: aleppo's old city has not seen such devastation since occupied by the mongol invaders eight centuries ago. this mosque for example dates back to 1315. this is syria's rich cultural heritage. and now everywhere we look it's been scarred by war. once bustling winding streets now a maze of ever-shifting front lines. overhead, the thundering of fighter jets. a small han lodging for caravans lies in ruins. for more than three millennia aleppo has been a cross roads for traders. we hurried through the courtyard of a traditional home. sheets are strung across streets to block snipers' line of sight. those who dare venture quickly across. a unit of fighters records people's names and license plates. only those who have shops here
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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